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Irvington-on-Hudson

Westchester County

Zip: 10533

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Thought of the Day
I am not young enough to know everything.

Yesterday's Thought Was
There are two tragedies in life. One is not to get your heart's desire. The other is to get it.
By George Bernard Shaw  1856 - 1950

Irish dramatist, literary critic, socialist spokesman and great playwright (wrote over 50 plays); In 1925 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Shaw accepted the honor but refused the money.


 Irvington-on-Hudson About A Town  About A Town

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Dance | Classical Ballet | Contemporary Ballet  Dance | Classical Ballet | Contemporary Ballet

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson, NY 10533 Demographics  Demographics for Irvington-on-Hudson

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Fire Department  Fire Department

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Historic Sites | Historic Hudson Valley  Historic Sites | Historic Hudson Valley

 

 10533 Children's Adult Programs Wireless Internet Access Free-Library Catalogs Tiffany Reading Room Westchester-Library-System schoolhouse  Irvington Public Library

914-591-7840  

 Irvington-on-Hudson Listings  Irvington-on-Hudson listings

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson MTA Metro-North | Train Stations  MTA Metro-North | Train Stations

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Municipalities | Cities, Towns, Villages  Municipalities | Cities, Towns, Villages

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Parks | Local and State  Parks | Local and State

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Police Departments / Sherriff's Offices  Police Departments / Sherriff's Offices

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Post Offices  Post Offices

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Real Estate | Realtors  Real Estate | Realtors

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson, NY 10533 Restaurants  Restaurants in Irvington-on-Hudson

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson School Districts | Public Schools  School Districts | Public Schools

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Senior Clubs | Activities for Seniors  Senior Clubs | Activities for Seniors

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Theater 'Live' Performances and Concerts  Theater 'Live' Performances and Concerts

 

 Irvington-on-Hudson Town History  Town History

 
 


Irvington-on-Hudson
Westchester County
Hudson Valley


Click to enlarge picture of "View from Irvington-On-Hudson".

View from Irvington-on-Hudson The Village of Irvington-on-Hudson , also known as Irvington, is located in the Town of Greenburgh in southwest Westchester County, New York. Irvington shares its western border with the Hudson River, Dobbs Ferry is to the south, and Scarsdale is northeast of Irvington. Irvington includes within its boundaries the community of Ardsley-on-Hudson. Ardsley-on-Hudson has its own zip-code and its own Metro-North station.

Starting in the 1850s, and largely due to Irvington's beautiful views of the Hudson River and its rural setting, many people, including wealthy New York City residents, began building large summer residences in the Village of Irvington.

"Close by Sunnyside is one of those marvelous villages with which America abounds: it has sprung up like a mushroom, and bears the name of Irvington, in compliment to the late master of Sunnyside. A dozen years ago not a solitary house was there, excepting that of Mr. Dearman, the farmer who owned the land. Piermont, directly opposite, was then the sole eastern terminus of the great New York and Erie Railway, and here seemed to be an eligible place for a village, as the Hudson River Railway was then almost completed. Mr. Dearman had one surveyed upon his lands; street were marked out, village lots were measured and defined; sales at enormous prices, which enriched the owner, were made, and now upon that farm, in pleasant cottages, surrounded by neat gardens, several hundred inhabitants are dwelling. One of the most picturesque of the station-houses upon the Hudson River Railway is there, and a ferry connects the village with Piermont. Morning and evening, when the trains depart for and arrive from New York, many handsome vehicles may be seen there." More about Irvington

MTA Metro-North Train Stations
For an easy commute to Grand Central Station in New York City from Irvington, take the train from either the Ardsley-on-Hudson or Irvington Train Station.

The MTA Metro-North in Ardsley-on-Hudson to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan is 21.7 miles and takes an average of 35 to 54 minutes, depending on the time of day.

The MTA Metro-North in Irvington to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan is 22.7 miles and takes an average of 37 to 56 minutes, depending on the time of day.

An MTA train ride from Grand Central Station in Manhattan to Ardsley-on-Hudson or Irvington stations in Westchester County, average 35 minutes to 47 minutes depending on the time of day.

Town Government
Irvington Village Hall is located at 85 Main Street, Irvington, NY 10533. "The Village of Irvington is governed by a five member Board of Trustees. The Board consists of a Mayor and four Trustees. The Mayor is the Chief Executive of the Village and is responsible for the conduct of public meetings and certain appointments. The Mayor and Trustees all have one equal vote for the adoption of resolutions. The day-to-day responsibility for the operations of the Village is performed by a full-time Village Administrator.

"Each fiscal year, the Mayor and Board of Trustees establish a concise list of priorities to address important issues or initiatives. The list provides a level of focus to the Board's activities and allows the community to see the activities of its elected officials. The priorities are subject to revision throughout the year."

Living in the Village of Irvington-on-Hudson
There are many things to do in and around Irvington-on-Hudson. Find activities, attractions, and places to go in the Village of Irvington N.Y. Visit one-of-a-kind "Mom & Pop Shops". As you walk down the main street of Irvington, toward the water, you will see beautiful views of the Hudson River ahead of you. After shopping, visit a park, and find a sunny spot to have a picnic lunch.

Visit a park in Irvington such as, Matthiessen Park, Memorial Park, Scenic Hudson Park, and Halsey Pond Park. Visit the Parks in Irvington-on-Hudson, sit by the water and look out at the boats, have a picnic, read and relax. Visit V.E. Macy Park, offering many fun cold-weather activities for things to do in the winter, or wonderful warm weather things to do in the summer.

Learn about The O'Hara Nature Center, with a mission "to promote the community's enjoyment and exploration of the woods; to educate and involve the community in understanding our local environment; and to demonstrate sustainable concepts that will inspire the community to live in balance with nature."Irvington also offers a Trailways Map for the Peter Oley Trailways System, a marked system of trails throughout hundreds of acres of open space in the Village of Irvington.

Find something to do with the kids this weekend in Westchester. Take the children to the playground at Matthiessen Park in Irvington. On warm days, bring a picnic packed with local fresh food from the Farmers Market in Irvington. Picnic at the park while looking out at the majestic Hudson River with views of the Tappan Zee Bridge in the background. If you're a golfer, play golf at one of the excellent golf courses in Ardsley-on-Hudson or other nearby towns; or if you love antiquing, visit the antique stores in Irvington. When its time to eat, select a café or one of the excellent Restaurants in Irvington, New York.

HISTORY OF IRVINGTON

History of Irvington
"The Village of Irvington was incorporated April 16, 1872. The territory of the village was part of the Bissightick track of the Van der Donck grant purchased by Frederick Phillipse in 1682. In 1817, Justice Dearman bought half of William Dutcher's farm and lived there until 1848 when it was sold to Gustavo F. Sanchi. In the same year, it was sold to John Jay, grandson of Justice John Jay, who arranged for it to be laid out in lots as the Village of Dearman. The lots were sold at public auction in New York City in 1850; the village of Dearman was formed. In 1854, Dearman , by popular vote, changed its name to "Irvington," honoring its beloved citizen, Washington Irvington, author of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle". Works by Louis Comfort Tiffany, who also lived here, can be seen in the town hall, library and the Irvington Presbyterian Church."
Source
Irvington Government and History at www.IrvingtonNY.gov

The Hudson, From, The Wilderness To The Sea, 1866
"Close by Sunnyside is one of those marvelous villages with which America abounds: it has sprung up like a mushroom, and bears the name of Irvington, in compliment to the late master of Sunnyside. A dozen years ago not a solitary house was there, excepting that of Mr. Dearman, the farmer who owned the land. Piermont, directly opposite, was then the sole eastern terminus of the great New York and Erie Railway, and here seemed to be an eligible place for a village, as the Hudson River Railway was then almost completed. Mr. Dearman had one surveyed upon his lands; street were marked out, village lots were measured and defined; sales at enormous prices, which enriched the owner, were made, and now upon that farm, in pleasant cottages, surrounded by neat gardens, several hundred inhabitants are dwelling. One of the most picturesque of the station-houses upon the Hudson River Railway is there, and a ferry connects the village with Piermont. Morning and evening, when the trains depart for and arrive from New York, many handsome vehicles may be seen there.

More About 19th Century Irvington
"Less than a mile below Irvington, and about half way between that village and Dobbs's Ferry, is the beautiful estate of Nevis, the home and property of the Honourable James A. Hamilton, eldest surviving son of the celebrated General Alexander Hamilton, one of the founders of the republic of the United States. It stands on the brow of the river slope, in the midst of a charming lawn, that extends from the highway to the Hudson, a distance of half a mile, and commands some of the finest and most extensive views of that portion of the river. The mansion is large, and its interior elegant. It presents many attractions to the lover of literature and art, aside from the delightful social atmosphere with which it is filled. There may be seen the library of General Hamilton, one of the choicest and most extensive in the country at the time of his death. There, too, may be seen a portrait of Washington, by Stuart, painted for General Hamilton, in 1798, when in expectation of a war with France, the United States organised a provisional government, and appointed him acting commanding general under the ex-president (Washington), who consented to be the chief."
Source
The Hudson, From, The Wilderness To The Sea
Author: Benson John Lossing
Publisher: Virtue and Yorston, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., March,1866

History and Antiquities
The following covers "History and Antiquities", a general collection of interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, and anecdotes about Westchester County and its towns. When reading the following, remember to keep in mind that this information was written approximately two hundred years ago. Population statistics and events have not been revised to reflect current events and perspective. We think this adds to the historical flavor and interest of the writings, giving a different perspective on much of this information and written in an "older world" writing style. "Historical Collections of the State of New York" , Published by S. Tuttle, 194 Chatham-Square, 1841

    Irvington
    "Irvington, 50.8 m. (175 alt., 2,759 pop.), named for Washington Irving, is another metropolitan suburb ringed by wooded estates. Near the northern end of the village is ® the Anna E. Poth Home for convalescent and aged members of the Companions of the Forest of America. The ornate brick mansion, hidden by a wall, was built in 1918 by Mrs. C. J. Walker (1867-1919), a pioneer Negro businesswoman. About 1905, when Mrs. Walker was a laundress in St. Louis, Missouri, she concocted a preparation to straighten tightly curled hair that revolutionized the appearance of members of her race. In 1910, she settled in Indianapolis, Indiana, where she established the Mme. C. J. Walker factory and laboratories for the manufacture of various cosmetics, and opened a training school for her agents and beauty culturists. Here interests were wide; in time her sales agents were acting as organizers of social welfare clubs and were carrying on educational propaganda of all kinds among Negroes. She eventually moved to New York and as 'Madame C. J. Walker of New York and Paris' became a leader in Harlem activities. A year after this house had been completed she died, leaving an estate worth more than $1,000,000, two-thirds of which went to educational institutions and charities. The house still contains her ivory-and-gold pipe organ, her tapestries, and some of her imported gold and ivory furniture.

    "Odell Inn ®, just south of the Main St. traffic booth, built about 1693, is now the superintendent's cottage of the Murray estate. When the Albany Post Road was opened in 1723, the one-and-a-half-story stone dwelling became a favorite stage stop. On August 31, 1776, the Committee of Safety of the State Convention met in the inn, then occupied by Jonathan Odell. Two months later the British took vengeance on Odell by destroying 1,000 bushels of his wheat, killing his hogs, cutting down his orchard, and carrying him off to a New York prison. In 1785 Odell bought the house and 463 acres from the Commissioners of Forfeiture, keeping the inn until his death in 1818."




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